How Do You Teach Possessive Pronouns Fun?

What is pronoun and give 5 examples?

A pronoun is used instead of a noun or noun phrase in a sentence.

A pronoun may take place of the name of a person, place or thing.

Pronoun examples: I, me, we, they, you, he, she, it, yours, himself, ourselves, its, my, that, this, those, us, who, whom….

How do you teach possessive pronouns?

Want to learn more?If you use a possessive pronoun before the thing that is owned, you should use: my, your, his, her, its, our, and their. … If you use a possessive pronoun after the thing that is owned, you should use: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs.More items…

How do you use possessive pronouns?

Possessive Pronouns: Used in SentencesThe kids are yours and mine.The house is theirs and its paint is flaking.The money was really theirs for the taking.We shall finally have what is rightfully ours.Their mother gets along well with yours.What’s mine is yours, my friend.The dog is mine.The cat is yours.More items…

Why do we use possessive pronouns?

We use possessive pronouns to refer to a specific person/people or thing/things (the “antecedent”) belonging to a person/people (and sometimes belonging to an animal/animals or thing/things). We use possessive pronouns depending on: number: singular (eg: mine) or plural (eg: ours)

What are the 12 personal pronouns?

In Modern English the personal pronouns include: “I,” “you,” “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” “they,” “them,” “us,” “him,” “her,” “his,” “hers,” “its,” “theirs,” “our,” “your.” Personal pronouns are used in statements and commands, but not in questions; interrogative pronouns (like “who,” “whom,” “what”) are used there.

What are the 10 Spanish pronouns?

The Spanish subject pronouns are: yo, tú, él, ella, usted in the singular, and nosotros/nosotras, vosotros/vosotras, ellos/ellas, ustedes in the plural. Don’t use the subject pronouns (other than usted and ustedes) with verbs except for emphasis or clarity.

What is the definition of possessive?

1 : being or belonging to the case of a noun or pronoun that shows possession “His” is a possessive pronoun. 2 : showing the desire to possess or control : unwilling to share. possessive. noun.

How do you practice possessive adjectives?

Choose the right possessive adjective:Two students didn’t do. my. your. his. her. … I have a car. My. Your. His. Her. … We have a dog. My. Your. His. Her. … Nancy is from England. My. Your. His. Her. … Ann and Nadia go to a high school. My. Your. His. Her. … Alan has a van. My. Your. His. … We go to a high school. My. Your. His. … I like singing. My. Your. His.More items…

What are personal and possessive pronouns?

The personal pronouns mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs are known as possessive pronouns: they refer to something owned by the speaker or by someone or something previously mentioned. For example: That book is mine.

Is someone’s possessive?

The possessive adjective for someone.

How do you teach possessive adjectives to children?

Drill game for possessive adjectives « Touch her hair. » Students touch the woman’s hair in the picture. « Touch his hair. » Students touch the man’s hair in the picture. « Touch its tail. » Students touch the tail on the animal picture, « Touch their hair. » Students touch the hair of the people in the group.

What are the 7 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

What are the two types of possessive pronouns?

There are two types of possessive pronouns: The strong (or absolute) possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, and theirs. They refer back to a noun or noun phrase already used, replacing it to avoid repetition: “I said that phone was mine.”

What is a possessive noun example?

This will generally include an’s for a singular person possessing one or more persons, places, or things, called a singular possessive noun; and an s’ for more than one person possessing singular or plural persons, places, or things. Here are some examples of plural possessive nouns: Mary’s dog. Mary’s dogs.

What is my your his her?

Possessive adjectives are my, your, his, her, its, our, their. Possessive adjectives occur before a noun (my car) or an adjective + noun (my new car). Rule 3. Possessive adjectives have no singular or plural. They are used with both singular and plural nouns (my book, my books).

What is a possessive pronoun that stands alone?

The absolute, or strong, possessive pronoun stands alone, does not modify a noun, and functions as a subject. It is often referred as a possessive pronoun., though it is, in fact, an absolute pronoun. The basic absolute pronouns are: his, hers, mine, yours, theirs, its, and ours.

How do you teach your and your?

Play a circle game where the children pass around an object as the music plays. When the music stops the student caught holding the object picks something out of the middle and says either, “This is my…” or, “That is your…” Make sure if they say “that” they are pointing not holding it.

What do possessive adjectives do?

They are words that modify a noun to show a form of possession, a sense of belonging or ownership to a specific person, animal or thing. The possessive adjectives that are used in the English language are: my, your, our, its, her, his, and their; each one corresponds to a subject pronoun.

What is the difference between a possessive pronoun and a possessive adjective?

A possessive adjective is an adjective that is used to show ownership. It comes before a noun in the sentence and lets us know to whom the noun belongs. … A possessive pronoun does show ownership, but it does not come before a noun or in a noun phrase.